Tabata Workout in 25

Fitness Class

 

 

 

 

 

 

A nice all round tabata working upper and lower body and core (remember to brace!)

Use A) as a warm up, or add one if you’ve more time to spare.

(A)

  1. Bounce (side to side, stay on the balls of feet)
  2. Plie* (jump legs out, jump to turn feet out, jump to turn feet in, jump to bring legs together)

(B)

  1. Squat punch
  2. Tricep dip (use a chair/step if preferred to floor)

(C)

  1. Glute push
  2. Fire hydrant

(D)

  1. In – out abs (C sit position bring the knees towards the chest then push legs out or down)
  2. Plank + toe taps

Starting from A) perform 20 seconds of exercise 1) followed by 10 seconds rest, then 20 seconds of exercise; 2) followed by 10 seconds rest (1 minute in total), repeat x 3 for remaining tabata timer (4 minutes in total). Take 1 minutes rest.

Move on to B) alternating exercises 1) & 2); repeat for C) TWICE -right & left side! & finally D). Enjoy!!

*For a low impact variation alternate between the right & left legs so the movement resembles an alternating side lunge.


Weight loss exercise tip by FitFarms Team.

Image credit: www.Active.com

Cardio-vascular Exercise and What is it?

Iheart would say that what makes an exercise cardio-vascular is that it gets you out of breath and allows you to keep that breathless state going for a prolonged period of time. For example any exercise or activity will cause you to get more breathless or for your heart rate to increase as your body is requiring more oxygen for a number of different reasons but if we asked you to do an exercise at the FitFarms weight loss boot camp that was too hard for you at this time then your body wouldn’t be able to cope with the oxygen requirement and you would fatigue too quickly so it’s not necessarily a specific exercise more like a level of output.

Basically you want to be able to elevate your heart rate and breathing as much as you can maintain for as long as you can. Take walking as an example, setting out at a constant pace will gradually increase your heart rate and oxygen saturation in your blood as long as you maintain a similar standard or effort that same pace will become more challenging as your body tires but is able to cope with the energy requirement if we then add a hill you may need to slow the pace to maintain a similar effort because you now have a greater resistance to work against. So your effort will be the same but your pace slower.

This example also carries over to your level of fitness as it improves your pace will increase but the effort level will feel similar to before. So then, how can we use cardio-vascular exercise? Well we could use it to improve our basic level of fitness which means to be able to do normal things better and to be able to recover from simple activities a little swifter, so something like going for a short walk 3 times a week could be enough to see improvement to this degree.

You could also use it to help with your higher level of fitness pushing your limits and challenging yourself more regularly, long undulating walks/jogs/runs swimming, cycling, CV equipment in a gym etc could all be used for this but exercises involving too much muscle focus like muscle specific weights/body weight exercises like squats or press ups etc will fatigue the muscles too quickly to be able to properly benefit the CV system. Also you can really effectively use these kind of exercises for recovery from more intensive sessions, the CV system is designed to work continuously and to recover whilst it works Muscles need a more thorough recovery so after a hard session that leaves your body aching your thinking you should avoid exercise until your ready to go at it again, but it’s actually much more beneficial to do something albeit less intensive to allow the increased blood flow to aid the muscle recovery by delivering much needed nutrients during the recovery process. So if you are looking to improve your heart health or want to improve your muscle recovery from more intensive exercise or would or would just like to be able to do the normal day to day activities better then the best exercises are the lower intensity movement based activities.

Editorial by Andy, FitFarms Health Manager


 

Image source: https://www.pinterest.com.au/SoSloffen/workout-quotes/

Legs Bums and Cardio Weight Loss Boot Camp Style

impossible-until-done

Here’s a burner for you guys.

Set 1.. 30 seconds each
1.Dorsal hip extension
2.Glute bridge
3. lunge with floor touch

Set 2.. 30 seconds each
1. Skaters
2. Jump backs
3. Single leg burpee squat thrusts

Set 3.. 30 seconds each
1. Single leg deadlifts
2. Standing hip extensions
3. Kossack lunges

Set 4.. 30 seconds each
1. Burpees
2. Rock climbers
3. Side steps 123

Set 4.. 30 seconds each
1. Squat pulse
2. Windmill squats
3. Squat thrusts

Once round is 15 minutes plus change, if you want to make it harder add in a resistance band if you have more time do it twice. Simple satisfaction!


 

Exercise routine tips by the FitFarms Health and Fitness Team. Check out our fitness camp date and rates.

Image credit: http://quoteideas.com/fitness-quotes/

There’s Snow Reason to Not Exercise

HobbyHere’s one of our London Fitness Camp all rounder routine for when you have the time but not through choice..

Warm up.. Neck rolls, shoulder rolls, arm circles, side to side reaches, hip rolls, hip hinge, deep squat, side lunge to runners lunge.. 30-40 seconds each.. or a minute to 1:30 if you fancy a real good warm up..

Fitness Camp Movement practice .. 5-10 minutes of each (not fitness or strength related it is not necessary to be out of breath while doing this) Prone position play In the press up position keeping either your hands or feet in one place try to move in as many different directions as possible make yourself as small as possible or as long.. move 180 degrees around shift forward and back and side to side Kneeling play..

In a kneeling position reach as far forward and behind as possible try to make each point of a clock face. Core strength and conditioning.. (1 minutes per exercise stopping to reset every time your back starts to ache or you feel you have lost the held position) Dead bug Bird man V-sit hold (Stretching into the rotation of the movement, don’t accept your natural finish point try to squeeze through it)

Supine alternating reach Sit back reach behind Treadmills Full body challenge .. 40 seconds work 20 seconds rest x 2 Rolling press ups / Hindu press ups Single leg squat thrusts Squat to centipede Hip lifts/glute bridge Table op glute bridge with dip ext

Weight Loss Boot Camp Resistance band arms and legs (20 reps per exercise 2-3 sets 20-30 seconds rest between)

Good mornings + deadlifts Squats + shoulder press Reverse flyes + over head squats Wood chop + side lunge upright row Cardio to finish.. (30 seconds per exercise start with 1 then take 10 seconds rest then do 2 and take 10 seconds rest then 3 etc until you’ve done all 5 in a row and then do it in reverse by removing one exercise at a time

Do this 2 times through for around 15 minutes work Sprints on the spot Jumping jacks or power jacks Front kicks or squat kicks Floor to ceiling Skaters Cool down as warm up.. (I personally don’t think we need static stretches at the end of a fitness camp workout so my warm ups are generally similar to the cool downs this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use static stretches during your weekly or monthly plan..

Hope you guys enjoy this and get in touch via our Facebook page or FitFarms website if you have any questions.

Thanks

Andy


 

Image source: www.pinterest.com.au/ldkelley2

Sir Roger Bannisters: True Epitome of Mental Toughness

Sir Roger Bannister Having read about Sir Roger Bannisters death at the age of 88 at the weekend, I mentioned it to my partner who recognised the name but couldn’t place why, having made a historic achievement twenty years before my partner was born, I only had to say ‘4 minute mile’ and he knew who I was talking about!

Born in 1929, Sir Roger Bannister went on to read medicine at Oxford and during his time as a student took up athletics, having only 30 minutes a day to spare for the track he utilised his knowledge of medicine to examine the mechanics of running and designed his own training plan.

This saw him get to running a mile in 4:24 and putting him as a possible for the 1948 London Olympics, four years later at the Olympics in Helsinki he set a new British record coming 4th in the 1500m. However what many would come to view as his greatest achievement came two years later on the 6th May 1954 when he became the first person to run a mile in under 4 minutes, 3:59.4 to be precise; for a quarter of a century people had been attempting to run a mile in under 4 minutes, no one had achieved it and most thought it impossible.

This new set record lasted only 46 days before it was beaten again, over twenty five years of trying and no one had managed to accomplish a sub 4 minute mile yet two people did it just 46 days apart -and it didn’t stop there, today there are thousands who have attained the same.

Sir Roger Bannister himself described that “it had become rather like everest, a challenge for the human spirit” and it is well regarded that the barrier to achieving the sub 4 minute mile was not a physical but a psychological one.

For me he is the epitome of mental toughness, he believed it possible when no one else did, was persistent, focused and motivated to push himself to the limit to succeed, and all starting from when he only had 30 minutes to spare! I mentioned that many came to view the sub 4 minute mile as his greatest achievement but interestingly once qualified as a Doctor Sir Roger Bannister went on to become a leading neurologist which he viewed as a far greater achievement than any he made as an athlete.


 

Editorial by FitFarms Health and Fitness Team

Image credit: ImpossibleHQ

What is Sports Therapy

sports therapy

A question I’ve been asked on several occasions, often followed by ‘is that like massage and stuff!’ In all honesty it’s quite a difficult question to answer for several reasons. Unlike most mainstream healthcare professions it is not regulated by the HCPC but instead comes under complimentary therapies, this means the title is not protected and essentially anyone with a sports massage qualification can use the title Sports Therapist (ST), that said many will preferentially use ‘Massage Therapist’, as many with a degree will use ‘Graduate Sports Therapist’ to differentiate.

That’s not to dismiss massage therapists as there are many who have spent years developing their skill and understanding, and are not necessarily any less knowledgeable than those flaunting a degree. With the availability of CPD courses sometimes those who trained initially as massage therapists will have added other treatment modalities to their skill set and be equipped to offer more than just massage – further adding to the confusion! An explanation I read that made the most sense to me was along the lines that with a degree the expectation is there that the practitioner should be better able to understand research to choose what to integrate into their practice.

Going back to the initial question, yes a Sports Therapist will often massage – amongst other things! Adding to the difficulty with the question is the various settings and teams that ST’s can work in, unsurprisingly many work in sports -some will work at events on an as and when basis, some work for teams/clubs either part time such as on match days providing pre-event work like massage, stretching and taping, as well as potentially pitch side first aid; some will work on training days too assessing injuries and designing rehabilitation plans; and some will work full time incorporating screening to prevent injuries as well as strength and conditioning. ST’s often work in gyms as availability of equipment to use for rehabilitative exercise is a huge benefit, and there’s many whose interest and additional qualifications lie in fitness. There are others who work equally as well in clinics, often alongside other healthcare practitioners. Some incorporate other additional qualifications such as nutrition or sports psychology into their roles too. The title itself can be a bit misleading as although it has ‘sports’ in it, the basis of what a ST predominantly does clinically is assess musculoskeletal injuries – not always sustained from sport! It is little wonder then that many go on to further education often studying aligned subjects such as Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy.

To conclude and try to answer the question ‘what is Sports Therapy?’ succinctly I think the simplest answer is ‘a many and varied thing’.


Editorial by FitFarms Health and Fitness Team

Image credit: HFE.co.uk

Inspirations: Getting to know FitFarms’ Sports Therapist

Jennie HebbIn the words of Julie Andrews ‘Lets start at the very beginning’, this is my first time writing a blog so it does indeed seem like a very good place to start!

As a child, when asked what I wanted to be when I grew up I always replied ‘a dancer’, that changed the day I met the school careers advisor whose advice went: ‘it’s a very hard career to get into, think of something else!’ It had never occurred to me to be anything else, and so I ended up like many not knowing what I wanted to do, and eventually working in retail.

I took up yoga as a hobby at twenty two which I found I loved, there’s lots of schools of yoga and the one I found (or which found me) focused a lot on correcting and adapting postures which I found really interesting. Now career wise I progressed to management but always felt I’d fell into it rather than chose it and scoured prospectuses hoping to find what I’d ‘feel’ I should be doing, while filling my spare time with yoga and exercise classes.

I can and I will QuoteI met my partner when I was thirty and we moved away; it was one of those strange times in life where it felt like everything was coming together and falling apart at the same time. I realised I’d been searching for what I ‘should’ be doing and not looking under my nose at what I had been doing, and so I began looking into courses to teach exercise classes; I then ventured off (as I tend to when googling) to looking at university courses and found Sports Therapy a course that really resonated with me. I was apprehensive as I’d never thought of myself as particularly clever, but I’m fortunate to have a supportive partner who encouraged me to go to the college open day. I think there’s a lot to be said for support, as well as for effort and determination.

Today I now have a BSC (Hons) Sports Therapy, ITEC Level 4 Sports Massage and CYQ Level 2 in Exercise to music and gym based instruction, unsurprisingly I’m also aiming to add yoga in the future.

It’s been quite a journey this far but it’s taught me that anything is possible if you’re brave enough to try!

Jennie Hebb
FitFarms Sports Therapist
BSc (Hons) Sports Therapy

 


 

Image credit: Picturequotes.com

FitFarms Roast Cod with Ratatouille

Roasted Cod Ratatouille

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 x 170g fillet cod
  • 1 cloves of garlic
  • 150g aubergine
  • 1 onion
  • 150g courgets
  • 1 pepper each ( red, yellow, green)
  • 4 TSP rich home made tomato sauce
  • 4 TSP olive oil
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • Salt , pepper
  • Rosemary, thyme

METHOD

  • In a big pan start to put olive oil garlic and onion and herbs that have already been finely chopped.
  • Panfry for 10 minutes slowly until brown.
  • Then add the rest of ingredients.
  • When the Ratatouille is ready, put the cod in a baking tray with oil and salt and pepper for twenty minutes at 220C.
  • Then add the oil, garlic, parsley and smoked paprika. Put back into the oven and cook for 3 or 4 minutes.

 

Roasted Cod preparation photo above by Great British Chefs.  Check out the ingredients and method of preparation here.

Visit our blog’s recipe section for more amazing and healthy food preparation and ideas.

FitFarms for Families at London Fitness Boot Camp

Fitness FamiliesOne of our most popular courses is the FitFarms for Families programme. They run during the school holidays and have become very popular. The next available one is at FitFarms London Fitness Boot Camp which is in easy driving distance from the M25 and is already 50% occupied.

On the latest spring half term course we had 8 children and 9 adults from England and Ireland. These style of fitness camps are important to be experienced by both the child and parent so when they go home to their normal lifestyle they can support each other towards their weight loss and fitness goals.

Kim the FitFarms holistic weight loss boot camp dance instructor was in charge of the majority of children’s sessions. She did some simple dance step classes, agility using cones and some games style exercises using balls.

The children were all fantastic and one day even went walking in the snow. It was absolutely freezing but they dressed up well in hats and gloves and off they went into the snowy distance.

The next FitFarms For Families course is on May 25th and is at our London holistic weight loss boot camp. It’s easy for driving and if you do decide to drive we have plenty of free parking at the weight loss and fitness camp.

FitFarms Pearl Barley Risotto

Pearl Barley Risotto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing a delicious Pearl Barley Risotto serve for 2 people.

INGREDIENTS

  • 150g pearl barley
  • 350 ml hot water
  • 1/2 onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 branch of celery
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 red pepper
  • 2 grated tomatoes
  • 1/2 aubergine
  • 1 courget
  • 4 flowers of cauliflower
  • 4 flowers of broccoli
  • 3TSP olive oil
  • 20 g butter
  • 40 g cheese ( cottage)
  • Salt pepper 2 TSP smoke paprika

METHOD

  • Put the barley in the water the day before
  • Finely chop the onion, garlic, celery, carrot, and pepper and pan fry with oil until browned.
  • Add the paprika and the tomatoes, then the barley, aubergine and the courget.
  • Stir slowly similar to a risotto
  • When the barley has cooked (approx 25 minutes) add the butter and the cheese
  • Steam the cauliflower and broccoli separate and use for decoration

 


 

Check out more FitFarms Recipes here.

Image Credit: The Cheerful Kitchen